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Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of On the structuralist view of inflation in some Latin American countries found in the catalog.

On the structuralist view of inflation in some Latin American countries

Fischer, Bernhard

On the structuralist view of inflation in some Latin American countries

a reassessment

by Fischer, Bernhard

  • 141 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Kiel Institute of World Economics, Dept. IV in Kiel .
Written in English

    Places:
  • South America.
    • Subjects:
    • Inflation (Finance) -- South America.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: leaf [20]

      Statementby Bernhard Fischer, Thomas Mayer.
      SeriesWorking paper - Kiel Institute of World Economics ; no. 103, Kieler Arbeitspapiere ;, Arbeitspapier Nr. 103.
      ContributionsMayer, Thomas, 1927- joint author.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHG805 .F57
      The Physical Object
      Pagination19, [1] leaves ;
      Number of Pages19
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4216282M
      LC Control Number80495921

      deal with inflation), determining the causes of Latin American inflation is an important first step. By extending Har-berger's model to sixteen Latin American countries for the period , this paper investigates the impact of monetary fac-tors on inflation and, in particular, the ex-tent to which countries . Latin America and the Caribbean: Annual inflation rates December to December, selected years, in %

        Latin America and the Caribbean growing again after last year’s contraction Regional rebound largely due to recoveries in Argentina and Brazil Unlike in wealthier nations, lowering interest rates to stimulate the economy is not an easy option in the region WASHINGTON, Oct. 11, – Latin America and the Caribbean is expected to grow again this year after suffering a significant. Developing countries typically spend about 7% of their Gross Domestic Product Purchasing Power Parities (GDP PPP) on health. For example, U.S.$2 billion out of U.S.$28 was spent in recent years in a Latin American country, or $ annually per person with per capita annual income of about U.S.$2, (Judd, ). Ideally, the investment in.

        In the early s, consequently, many Latin American countries attacked their inflation problems with a new energy. Initially, a common tactic was to fix the exchange rate, in the hope that an exchange-rate peg might stabilize inflation expectations and help to "import" some necessary monetary discipline. The history of Latin America during World War II is important because of the significant economic, political, and military changes that occurred throughout much of the region as a result of the war. The war caused significant panic in Latin America over economics as a large portions of economy of the region depended on the European investment capital, which was shut down.


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On the structuralist view of inflation in some Latin American countries by Fischer, Bernhard Download PDF EPUB FB2

Seers's 'Theory of Inflation and Growth in Underdeveloped Economies Based on the Experience of Latin America', Oxford Economic Papers, June In the Appendix, under the title 'A Note on the Structuralist School', Mr. Seers presents an historic account of the development of that doctrine and some of its representative bibliography.

The locus. ON THE STRUCTURALIST VIEW OF INFLATION IN SOME LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES: A REASSESSMENT. Bernhard FISCHER. Search for more papers by this author. Thomas MAYER. Search for more papers by this author. Bernhard FISCHER.

Search for more papers by Cited by: 9. The purpose of this paper is to give further empirical evidence for the structuralist view of inflation in six selected Latin American countries: Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru.

The purpose of this paper is to give further empirical evidence for the structuralist view of inflation in six selected Latin American countries: Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru.

They have all been highly prone to inflation in the past. First, we outline the theoretical background of our by: 9. his book, Furtado ([] ) put forward what has been regarded as the most elaborated structuralist argument against the application of the monetary approach to developing countries (see e.g.

King ). Furtado’s argument that Latin American inflation was essentially. Structural theory of inflation has been put forward as an explanation of inflation in the developing countries especially of Latin America.

The well-known economists, Myrdal and Straiten who have proposed this theory have analysed inflation in these developing countries in terms of structural features of their economies.

disequilibrium in Brazil and other Latin American countries. Furtado ([]pp. ) was probably the first to relate persistently high inflation that prevailed in many countries of the region after the early s to the new growth pattern experienced at the time, whose main feature was import-substituting industrialization.

The economic development and inflation in Mexico and other countries. Latin Americans. of thought and the Latin American structuralist theory of inflation. controlled inflation, with some. of inflation should tend toward its steady-state level as found by Friedman 20 years ago.

This is consistent with the Latin American experience of the last two decades. The paper proceeds as follows. In Section 2, we expose the simple fact, shared by most Latin American countries, that inflation and seignorage revenues were.

the Latin American countries!except Cuba and Nicaragua) into three groups. During the twenty-five years between andthe high inflation countries experienced average inflation rates of more than 30 percent per year.

All the countries in this group are found below the equator. The low inflation countries had average. Latin American countries, especially their Governments, do not show any financial responsibility or prudence. been of the chronic variety or of the mag'hitude experienced by some of the Latin American countries.

If we are to be guided by the structuralist view of inflation in a develop- ing country, India exhibits many of the institutional. Abstract. This paper argues that three main elements form the basis of both the Latin American and the European branches of the structuralist school of inflation theory.

These elements are: (1) relative prices that change when economic structure changes; (2) downward inflexibility of (some) money prices; and (3) a passive money supply closing the deflationary gap caused by price increases.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Wachter, Susan M. Latin American inflation. Lexington, Mass.: Lexington Books, © (OCoLC)   After suffering from a high inflation for a long time, almost forty years, the Latin American countries have put a step forward towards the adoption of inflation targeting during the last decade.

Therefore, now, the inflation rate has come down below 10% which helps to improve the economic condition of Latin America. Cunado, J., & De Gracia, F. Oil prices, economic activity and inflation: evidence for some Asian countries.

Fischer, B., & Mayer, T. On the structuralist view of inflation in some Latin American countries: A reassessment.

and causality in the United States and the United Kingdom: A theoretical explanation of. In recent decades, Latin American countries have experienced considerably high levels of inflation. While an abundant body of research regarding this topic exists, the two most common viewpoints regarding the causes of inflation in these countries include the monetarist view and the structuralist view.

There is a significant amount of relative. Despite recognizing the exogenous, cost-push nature of recent inflationary pressures in Latin America, plus the difficulties faced by monetary authorities in dealing, under such circumstances, with internal and external disequilibria simultaneously, intellectual attention in policy circles remains focused on demand-side issues and policy instruments.

The Latin American experience shows how some of its largest countries have adopted floating exchange rate regimes and inflation targeting while continuing to intervene in foreign exchange markets.

This edited volume reviews detailed accounts from several central banks in Latin America and provides insight into how, and with what aim, many. Background. The origins and dynamics of high and chronic inflation have been analyzed in detail in the literature (see, for example, Bruno, ; Kiguel and Liviatan, ; and Calvo and Végh, ).However, in view of the specific objectives of this paper, a brief reconte, with minor variations, may be of some use.

In the recent Latin American experiences—in Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and. Structuralist theory of inflation 1. STRUCTURAL THEORY OF INFLATION Prof. Prabha Panth, Osmania University, Hyderabad 2. 2 Structural theory of inflation • Myrdal and Streeten have contributed to this theory of inflation.

• To explain inflation in less developed countries, especially Latin America. Preface Inflation in Latin America: A Monetarist View An Alternative View: The Structuralist Argument Revisited Inflation in a Small Country: A Case Study of Bolivia A Summing Up Appendix: Statistical Aspects of Inflation Rates Bibliography Index: Responsibility: Julio Harold Cole.Foreign exchange intervention is widely used as a policy tool, particularly in emerging markets, but many facets of this tool remain limited, especially in the context of flexible exchange rate regimes.

The Latin American experience can be informative because some of its largest countries adopted floating exchange rate regimes and inflation targeting while continuing to intervene in foreign.And in the Euro area, there are signs that in some countries, at least, growth may be picking up, albeit slowly.

There are many reasons for the global expansion. A major one is the reduction in inflation rates worldwide. Over a long period high inflation inflicted great harm on many countries in Latin America and, indeed, in other parts of the.